non sum qualis eram

I'm a psychologist with a Ph.D. in Applied Experimental / Human Factors Psychology. I work at Riot Games as a user researcher. I like science, games, and things that are nice.

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Why I'm not a "gamer"

pattheflip:

I decided to sit out for most of the last month or so of games internet misogyny shit, opting instead of signal boost the good people willing to jump into the fray themselves. There is one thing I wanted to write a short note about, though — the identity of “gamer” and why I haven’t used it myself…

Regardless of how she feels about them, my ex-girlfriend’s child is going to grow up in a world where videogames do not carry the kind of negative stigma they had when we were young. I don’t give a flying fuck what you think about Zoe Quinn.

http://midnightresistance.co.uk/articles/plight-grown-ass-gamer

The bizarre anti-Zoe, anti-woman, dogwhistle campaign is something really strange.

wolfhard:

GYM LIPSthe cleric
Level 1 Strength - 15 Intelligence - 13 Wisdom - 17 Constitution - 11 Dexterity - 10 Charisma - 14

wolfhard:

GYM LIPS
the cleric

Level 1
Strength - 15
Intelligence - 13
Wisdom - 17
Constitution - 11
Dexterity - 10
Charisma - 14

catandkitty:

do you know why feminism has a horrible image?

i’ll let you in on a secret here, it’s because people hate women

(via machinery)

gameological:


"In the 2000 game, the biggest threats are oppression and harassment from authority figures. In the 2008 game, bullying and toxicity threaten to destroy the culture from within. The kids of World are placed in a direct competition that can only have one winner, forcing them to view each other as threats. They also have to contend with the Reapers, older teenage enforcers who target players for sport. In World’s vision of Shibuya, kids their own age are a threat, and the older kids are a source of fear and persecution instead of guidance and support.”

—For Our Consideration: Two ultra-hip Japanese games of the 2000s showcased youth culture’s uplifting power

gameological:

"In the 2000 game, the biggest threats are oppression and harassment from authority figures. In the 2008 game, bullying and toxicity threaten to destroy the culture from within. The kids of World are placed in a direct competition that can only have one winner, forcing them to view each other as threats. They also have to contend with the Reapers, older teenage enforcers who target players for sport. In World’s vision of Shibuya, kids their own age are a threat, and the older kids are a source of fear and persecution instead of guidance and support.”

For Our Consideration: Two ultra-hip Japanese games of the 2000s showcased youth culture’s uplifting power

(via fakegirlgamer)